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Announcements

 
 

Reminder: Save the Date - 2019 Curriculum Retreat

On January 24, 2019, at the I-Hotel Conference Center, Carle Illinois will host its second annual curriculum retreat. This all-day event (8:30 - 5:00) will include curriculum updates, targeted small group workshops, large group breakout sessions, and hands-on sessions to build skills and course materials. This retreat is open to all faculty and staff of Carle Illinois.

Registration information and the day's schedule will be available in the next month. Please block your calendars now.

If there are any topics you would like to see covered or are interested in presenting a workshop, please contact Sol Roberts-Lieb for more information. 

 
     
 

 Lunch and Learn Recordings

Did you miss a previous lunch and learn? Want to hear the discussion? We have created a mediaspace channel that contains recordings of previous sessions. To access the channel, you will need to use your University of Illinois NetID and password.

As a reminder, Lunch and Learn sessions are held on the third Thursday of each month.

For call-in information, visit our events calendar. We are still looking for additional speakers for the Spring Semester. If you are interested, please contact Sol Roberts-Lieb. 

 
 

 

 
 

Dr. Coiado Presents at the BMES Conference

Dr. Coiado presented a study on the Bioeffect Caused by Ultrasound Application in Perfused Rat Heart at the annual Biomedical Engineering Society (BMES) meeting in Atlanta. The progress of ultrasound (SU) in medicine depends on a greater understanding of its interaction with biological tissues. Variations in the applied parameters, such as signal amplitude, duty factor (DF), resonance frequency and pulse repetition frequency (PRF) can make ultrasound interact differently depending on the type of tissue. The goal of this work is to study the bioeffects of ultrasound in perfused rat hearts, aiming to identify the mechanisms involved in the production of the cardiovascular effects.

 
     
 

Navigating Illinois: Illinois Mediaspace

Illinois Mediaspace, powered by Kaltura, is a free platform for displaying videos. Similar to YouTube, Mediaspace provides a secure place to host videos for use in your work at Illinois. CI MED currently houses all course videos here. 

While some videos do not require a login, many do. Please login with your netid and password for full access. If you have any questions, please contact Sol Roberts-Lieb or visit the Mediaspace Knowledgebase.

 
 

Research Opportunities

Events
 

Adapting Visual Exercises for Students with Visual Impairments
Thursday November 1

Many of us rely heavily on visual examples and exercises in the classroom. How can we be sure our classes are both engaging and accessible for those students with visual impairments or obstructions? In this interactive workshop, we will explore the benefits of universal design on the student experience, and work in groups to create course materials and activities that are accessible for all.

Room 428, Armory

Registration: Now Open

 
 
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Medical Education News
 

"We're Not Too Busy": Teaching With Time Constraints on Rounds

"Rounds are busy. When patient care becomes overwhelming, teaching often gets cut short. If clinical instructors do not teach with a deliberate focus on the time available, workflow is interrupted and learners lose attention." Check out these tips for teaching, by Flint Y. Wang and Jennifer R. Kogan, when you only have a limited time during your rounds. While these apply to rounds, this concept can be used for many disciplines. 

Teaching When Time is Limited

Published in February 2008 in BMJ, David M. Irby and LuAnn Wilkerson, conducted research on how to teach in small increments of time during patient care to provide powerful learning experiences for trainees. This study looked at a cohort of 179 Dutch medical students during an Internal Medicine Clerkship at 14 different sites, finding that the quality of supervision has a greater impact on clinical competence and knowledge than does the number of patients seen.