{preheader}
  ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌
 
Click here to see this online
 
 
 

May 17, 2019

 

 
 

Illinois’ universities are engines of innovation and economic growth. Each year they bolster the state’s talent pipeline with 25,000 new STEM graduates and drive discovery by conducting $2.4 billion in research & development activity. Over the past decade, Illinois’ universities have also increased efforts to ensure that innovations made possible by university research are able to reach the commercial marketplace through technology transfer and the creation of startup companies. By doing so, universities create economic growth through innovation and job creation. Over the past five academic years (2013-2014 through 2017-2018), students and faculty at Illinois’ universities have founded 978 startups, the largest volume of startup activity for any five-year period tracked by the Index. This level of startup activity represents an increase of 153% over the previous five-year period, when 386 startups were founded. Nearly two-thirds (65.5%) of startups founded over the past five years remain active, while 32.8% are inactive, and 1.6% have been acquired. Tech transfer startups—those backed by university IP—are significantly more likely to remain active at the five-year mark (78.1%), compared with non-tech transfer startups (45.9%).

 

 
 

Flooding, drought, storm surge and sea level rise: America’s Most Endangered Rivers® of 2019 spotlights the threat that climate change poses to rivers, clean water supplies, public safety and communities nationwide. From water scarcity on New Mexico’s Gila River, named the #1 Most Endangered River in the country, to sea-level rise on the Hudson and flooding on the Upper Mississippi, America’s Most Endangered Rivers of 2019 illustrates what’s at stake and the choices facing communities. Now in its 34th year, America’s Most Endangered Rivers® is a call to action. It spotlights rivers at a crossroads, where key decisions in the coming months will determine the rivers’ fates. Get the full report and take action. #3 on the list is the Upper Mississippi River, with increased flooding occurring throughout the Upper Mississippi basin due to climate change. Choking the river with new levees and traditional flood control structures threatens public safety by making flooding worse downstream.

 

 
 

“Map the Meal Gap” uses information from the USDA Food Security Survey to depict food insecurity county by county. Higher unemployment and poverty rates are associated with higher rates of food insecurity. While food insecurity exists in every county and congressional district in the country, not everyone struggling with hunger qualifies for federal nutrition assistance. Some people, including children and seniors, may be at greater risk of hunger. For children, food insecurity is particularly devastating. Not having enough healthy food can have serious implications for a child’s physical and mental health, academic achievement and future economic prosperity. Research shows an association between food insecurity and delayed development in young children; risk of chronic illnesses like asthma and anemia; and behavioral problems like hyperactivity, anxiety and aggression in school-age children. To learn more about local food insecurity and the food banks in your community, explore data from Feeding America’s annual Map the Meal Gap project.

 

 
 

Each year, AmeriCorps NCCC engages teams of members in projects in communities across the US. Service projects, which typically last from six to eight weeks, address critical needs related to natural and other disasters, infrastructure improvement, environmental stewardship and conservation, energy conservation, and urban and rural development. Members mentor students, construct and rehabilitate low-income housing, respond to natural disasters, clean up streams, help communities develop emergency plans, and address countless other local needs. Sponsoring organizations request the assistance of AmeriCorps NCCC teams by submitting a project application to the regional campus that covers that organization’s state. The campuses provide assistance in completing the application, developing a work plan, and preparing the project sponsor for the arrival of the AmeriCorps NCCC team. Non-profits (secular and faith-based), municipalities, state and federal governments, national and state parks, Indian tribes, and schools can apply.

 

UPCOMING EVENTS

May 22 (SEDAC Webinar) - Illinois Energy Conservation Code for Existing Buildings

June 5 (Springfield) - Central Illinois Volunteerism Conference

June 12 (Workshop) - Climate Economy in Southern Illinois – Creating Resilient Businesses, Jobs, and Communities

June 20, 2019 (Chicago) - Small Business Expo

July 14-17 (Columbia, MO) - Community Development Society Annual Conference

August 12-15 (Moline) - Midwest Community Development Institute