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March 2020

 
 
Fan Lam earns NSF CAREER award for enhanced brain mapping technology
 
 Fan Lam, Bioengineering assistant professor.
 

Fan Lam, assistant professor of Bioengineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, has received a National Science Foundation CAREER award, including more than $500,000 of support, for his work on enhanced brain imaging. Lam's project is "Ultrahigh-Resolution Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging for Label-Free Molecular Imaging of the Brain." More ...

 
Rohit Bhargava leads development of hybrid microscope that could bring digital biopsy to the clinic
 
 Two side-by-side versions of cells imaged by new hybrid microscope, and photo of Rohit Bhargava.
 

In new imaging research at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Rohit Bhargava, Founder Professor in Bioengineering, and his team have added infrared capability to a standard optical microscope and paired it with machine learning to enable digital biopsies — computational “stains” — without adding any dyes or chemicals to the tissue sample. The new imaging technology uses off-the-shelf components, allowing other researchers to easily build or upgrade their own microscopes. More ...

 
Study maps landmarks of peripheral artery disease to guide treatment development
 
 Cross-section image of narrowed artery and photo of Wawosz Dobrucki.
 

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign researchers led by Bioengineering Associate Professor Wawrzyniec Dobrucki used a suite of imaging methods to create the first holistic picture of peripheral artery disease recovery. As PAD is difficult to diagnose until patients are in advanced stages and there is no standard treatment, the researchers' aim was to develop landmarks to help physicians diagnose and create optimal, effective treatments. More ...

 
Andrew Smith and team create new way to count single molecules, numerous biomarkers; one aim is detecting responses to prostate cancer treatment
 
 Photo of Andrew Smith.
 

In work led by Bioengineering Associate Professor Andrew Smith at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, researchers developed a new microfluidic technique that advances the capabilities of the flow cytometer to be able to count, characterize and tag individual molecules. The new technology promises numerous implications for improving human health, including using it with biomarkers — with miR-375, in particular — to predict responses to prostate cancer treatment. More ...

 
Bioengineers at Illinois show new CRISPR base-editing technology slows ALS progression in mice
 
 Photo of Bioengineering at Illinois researchers Colin Lim, Thomas Gaj, Michael Gapinske, and Pablo Perez-Pinera.
 

A team of researchers in Bioengineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign demonstrated that they can slow the progression of the deadly disease ALS in mice. To do this, they used a new version of CRISPR base editing to change the DNA instead of cutting through both strands. The team includes, pictured here left to right: Colin Lim, Ph.D. student; Thomas Gaj, assistant professor; Michael Gapinske, Ph.D. student; and Pablo Perez-Pinera, assistant professor. Gaj and Perez-Pinera led the study. More ...

 
Team deciphers how myotonic dystrophy generates lethal heart dysfunctions
 
Wawrzyniec Cobrucki and Jamila Hedhli. 
 

Researchers determined key molecular events that lead to heart abnormalities in myotonic dystrophy, a common form of muscular dystrophy. The work answers questions about why and how the heart develops abnormal rhythms and dysfunction in patients with myotonic dystrophy, work that is expected to lead to better treatments. From Bioengineering at Illinois, the team includes Associate Professor Wawrzyniec Dobrucki and Jamila Hedhli, recent Ph.D. graduate and postdoctoral fellow. More ...