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March 6, 2020

 

 
 

The "Why I Apprentice" national JFF contest is calling upon today's youth to share why being an apprentice has changed their life. Whoever can answer the big question in less than a minute could win $1,000 and a trip to New Orleans to attend the JFF Horizons conference, where the winning video will be shown to a nationwide audience of more than 1,000 educators, training experts, and employers. Second place will win $500, and third place will win $250. In videos of no more than 60 seconds, contestants share what they like best about being an apprentice--what they've learned, how much they've grown, and how much fun they've had. Entries are due March 31. The top videos will be posted on YouTube, where teens all over the country will be able to see them. This competition is open to youth ages 16 to 21 who are participating in Registered Apprenticeship Programs in the United States. Learn more by checking out the video challenge website; download the flyer here.

 

 
 

According to Roberto Gallardo, Purdue University, workforce is the number one issue when it comes to creating, attracting, retaining, or expanding businesses. It has always been this way, but in the unfolding information age, it is even more so. According to the Brookings Institution, the collective knowledge and capabilities of the workforce in the United States is worth an estimated $240 trillion, ten times more than all the urban land in the country. Regions and communities that are not able to develop, retain, or attract talent, will struggle to benefit and thrive in this post-industrial world. The U.S. Congress joint economic committee calls this issue a “brain drain (or gain)." Gallardo reported on trends involving one of the indicators associated with talent: share of those with a bachelor’s degree or higher. The good news is that the share of those ages 25 and older with a bachelor’s degree or higher tripled between 1970 and 2018 in the U.S. and across all three types of counties analyzed: metropolitan, small city and rural. The most significant increase took place in metropolitan counties where the share with a bachelor's degree increased 22 percentage points between 1970 and 2018. Small city and rural counties followed, followed with 13.6 and 11.7 percentage points, respectively. As of 2018, however, small city and rural counties’ share lagged by more than half of their metropolitan counterparts.

 

 
 

For cities and states across the country, active duty military, veterans and their families are an important part of community life — whether they live on base, in nearby towns or are deployed or stationed overseas. But military families may not realize just how important they are when it comes to the 2020 Census. They should know that the 2020 Census will have an impact on their communities’ political representation and billions of dollars in funding annually for the next 10 years. In mid-March, all households in the United States, including those of service members, veterans and their families living in the United States, will receive an invitation to respond to the 2020 Census. For the first time, people can respond to the census online, by phone or by mail. The online option could be particularly popular with enlisted active duty military members, more than half of whom are younger than 25 years old, according to Department of Defense (DOD) data from 2017. Most military households are responsible for responding to the 2020 Census on their own if they are stationed or living in the United States. People will be counted where they live and sleep most of the time as of April 1, 2020 (Census Day). Remember to count everyone who lives in your household, including young children, newborns and any relatives or others.

 

 
 

Noon - 1PM, Thursday, March 26, 2020

Please join Illinois Extension on Thursday, March 26, at 12PM (Central time) for Preparing for Extreme Weather, an important webinar for local officials, community partners, and professionals across Illinois. State Climatologist Trent Ford will discuss the science and impacts of climate change as they relate to water in Illinois. Following his presentation, Illinois State Water Survey engineer and hydrologist Sally McConkey will explain where to find floodplain information, how to interpret a floodplain map, and further important information. Participants will be able to ask question during a Q & A following the presentation. There is no cost to attend, but you must register.

 

 

UPCOMING EVENTS

March 12 (Small Farms Webinar) - Getting Started in Drip Irrigation

March 18-20 (Springfield) - 2020 Illinois Main Street Conference

March 20 (Small Farms Webinar) - The Basics for Goats and Sheep

March 26 (LGE Webinar) - Preparing for Extreme Weather

March 31 (JFF Contest) -Why I Apprentice

 

 
 
 
 
 

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