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Illinois Program for Research in the Humanities Announces Fellowship Awards 2020-2021

The Illinois Program for Research in the Humanities (IPRH) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign has awarded its annual Faculty and Graduate Student Fellowships to seven faculty members and seven graduates students from the campus for the 2020–21 academic year. The theme for the year is “The Global and Its Worlds,” and is offered in parternship with the Illinois Global Institute. The IPRH Fellows Seminar will be open to affiliates of these centers and programs who want to attend on a first-come, first-served basis.

IPRH is also pleased to announce the Training in Digital Methods for Humanists (TDMH) Fellows for 2020-21. Supported by the Investment for Growth Initiative of the Offices of the Provost and the Vice Chancellor for Research and Innovation, these fellowships help to equip faculty with the training, technology and support needed to lead campus intitiaves in digital transformation, data and design.

IPRH would also like to announce its 2020 Ragdale Residential Creative Fellowship recipient and its first cohort of Summer Faculty Research Fellowship recipients. Ragdale Fellowships offer creative practitioners a four-week summer residence at Ragdale’s non-profit, interdisciplinary artists’ community. IPRH’s new Summer Faculty Research Fellowships are designed to help faculty maximize the summer for research in service of their ongoing professional development. They provide an infusion of resources to jumpstart or fuel an ongoing research project over the summer months. Two fellowships each are awarded in both tenureline and specialized faculty categories. In light of the onoing COVID-19 situation, these inaugural Summer 2020 Faculty Research Fellows will have an extended timeline to complete their work.

Please join IPRH in congratulating these new fellows.

IPRH Fellowships, 2020-21: The Global and Its Worlds

Faculty Fellows

  • Zsuzsa Gille, Sociology: “The New Globals: Anthropocene and Capitalocene”
  • Wail S. Hassan, Comparative and World Literature / English: “Arab Brazil: Literature, Culture, and Orientalism”
  • Harriet Murav, Comparative and World Literature / Slavic Languages and Literatures: “Archive of Violence: The Literature of Abandonment and the Russian Civil War (1917-1922)
  • Carl Niekerk, Germanic Languages and Literatures: “Enlightenment Anthropology”
  • Gian Piero Persiani, East Asian Languages and Cultures: “Locating the Global: Vernacularization and Sino-Japanese Cultural Diglossia in Japan 900-1100 CE”
  • Makoto Harris Takao, Music: “Of Mission and Music: Japanese Christianity and Its Reflection in Early Modern Europe”
  • Robert Tierney, East Asian Languages and Cultures / Comparative and World Literature: “Importing Democracy to East Asia”

Graduate Student Fellows

  • Olivia Hagedorn, History: “‘Call me African’: Black Women and Diasporic Cultural Feminism in Chicago, 1930-1980”
  • Ji Hyea Hwang, Comparative and World Literature: “Transcolonial Nationhood: Global Interplay in Irish and Korean National Theatre”
  • Elizabeth Matsushita, History: “Disharmony of Empire: Race and the Making of Modern Musicology in Colonial North Africa"
  • Luis Pinilla Gomez, Art History: “Public Aesthetics and Collaborative Studio Practices in South America, 1960s-1970s”
  • Nubras Samayeen, Landscape Architecture: “‘An Architecture of the Land’—The National Assembly Building Complex in Dhaka, Bangladesh”
  • Jeongsu Shin, Anthropology: “Worldy Ecologies: Landscape, History, and Environmental Politics on Jeju Island”
  • Naomi Taub, English: “Distant Proximities: Whiteness and Worldedness in Contemporary Jewish Literature”
TDMH Fellowships, 2020-21
  • Josue David Cisneros, Communcation: “Migrant Arts, Alien Affects”
  • Tamara Chaplin, History: “Cabarets and Counterpublics: Female Same-Sex Intimacy and the French Public Sphere, 1930-2013”
  • John Randolph, History: SourceLab and “The Classroom and the Future of the Historical Record”
  • Dustin Tahmahkera, American Indian Studies: “Becoming Sound: Sonic Quests of Healing in Indian Country” and "Post-Oklahoma: An AlterNative Folk Musical”
IPRH-Ragdale Residential Creative Fellowship, 2020

Amy Hassinger, Creative Writing, English

Is the search for joy in the face of global climate disruption and anthropogenic extinction pure privileged self-indulgence? Or might it also benefit the collective? Might it help move us, individually and communally, through environmental grief toward productive action? During her time at Ragdale this summer, Amy Hassinger will be plumbing these questions as she works on her book-length lyric essay They Could SingThey Could Sing explores via memoir, research-based inquiry, and lyrical meditation three main themes: jazz singing, climate apocalypse, and the pursuit of joy.

IPRH Summer Faculty Research Fellowships, 2020
  • Jose Atiles, Sociology: “Puerto Rico is Open for Business: Exceptionality, Financialization and Colonialism”
  • Honaida Ahyad, Linguistics / Translation Studies: Translation of Manahil Sindi’s novel Nisf Estiwa (Half-Cooked), from Makkan into English
  • Carolyn Fornoff, Spanish and Portuguese: “Subjunctive Aesthetics: Mexican Culture in the Era of Climate Change”
  • Craig Koslofsky, History: “The Deep Surface: Skin in the Early Modern World, 1450-1750”