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Click here to see this online
 
 
 

July 16, 2021

 

 
 
Help Wanted 
 

Illinois is hiring seasonal employees with a starting wage of $11 per hour to work at the Illinois and Du Quoin state fairs. Krista Lisser, public information officer for the Illinois Department of Agriculture, said the state is looking to hire a total of 600 seasonal employees to work the two state fairs, one in Springfield and the other in Du Quoin. The jobs include maintenance, customer service-oriented positions such as cashiers and clerks, security, parking staff and tram drivers. The application is at https://bit.ly/2T6LHiH and can be submitted to the IDOA by attaching it to an email and sending it to agr.seasonalhires@illinois.gov. Applications can be turned in at 801 E. Sangamon Ave., Springfield, inside gate 11 of the Illinois State Fairgrounds or, for Du Quoin, at the administration office of its state fairgrounds at 655 Executive Drive, Du Quoin. The Illinois State Fair begins Aug. 12 and will run through Aug. 22. The Du Quoin State Fair will begin Aug. 27 and run through Labor Day weekend.

 

 
 
 CDI
 

The Midwest Community Development Institute (Midwest CDI) provides training to those actively engaged in building a vibrant and better community. Participants include development professionals, community leaders, public officials, and entrepreneurs. We strive to make the training fun, interactive, and practical so that it can be immediately applied in their own communities. In addition to learning new skills, CDI helps participants to build relationships and develop a network of allies, resulting in an on-going source of support throughout their careers. Participating in CDI and meeting additional criteria also provides an opportunity to add to your credentials. You can earn certification as a Professional Community and Economic Developer (PCED) from the Community Development Council, (CDC) a nonprofit organization founded in 1995 to promote the advancement of standards of competence for community development professionals through accreditation of community development educational programs and professional certification. For more information, go to https://www.midwestcdi.org

 

 
 
ACS 
 

The majority of families that received benefits from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) in 2018 included at least one employed individual, according to the American Community Survey (ACS). In 2018, 12% of the 79 million families in the United States received SNAP benefits at some point in the previous 12 months. More than three-quarters of those families had at least one person working and about one-third included two or more workers, a clear indication that many families that rely on nutritional assistance worked. SNAP, a federal program that helps millions of low-income families put food on their table, provides benefits to supplement a family’s food budget and purchase healthy food. SNAP benefits are given monthly on an EBT (electronic benefits transfer) card and can be used to purchase food at grocery and convenience stores and at some farmers markets. In addition to information about receipt of SNAP benefits in 2018, the ACS asks about the characteristics of households and families, including employment of family members. 

 

 
 
 USDA Pomological Watercolor Collection
 

Between 1886 and 1942, the Agriculture Department commissioned artists to document quickly changing fruit and nut cultivars across the United States at a time when color photography wasn't widely available. The USDA made the more than 7,500 paintings in its Pomological Watercolor Collection available to the public, downloadable in high resolution. The USDA Pomological Watercolor Collection documents fruit and nut varieties developed by growers or introduced by USDA plant explorers around the turn of the 20th century. Technically accurate paintings were used to create lithographs illustrating USDA bulletins, yearbooks, and other series distributed to growers and gardeners across America. Almost 4000 of the images are of apples, including the adjacent image of Arkansas Black Apples. The plant specimens illustrated originated in 29 countries and 51 states and territories in the U.S. The paintings were created by approximately twenty-one artists commissioned by USDA for this purpose. Some works are not signed.

 

 
 

UPCOMING EVENTS

July 27 - Developing Broadband Leadership (Part 4): Moving a Broadband Project Forward

July 29 - Geothermal in Illinois: Overview and Technology

August 3 - Developing Broadband Leadership (Part 5): Broadband Adoption and Affordability: Ensuring Broadband for Everyone

August 9-12 - Midwest Community Development Institute (CDI)

 

 

 
 
 
 
 

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