‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌   ‌
 
 

May 29, 2020

 

 
 

The Illinois Connected Communities grant program will assist counties, cities, villages, or school districts in planning and capacity building, laying the groundwork for improved broadband access, adoption, and utilization. Grants of up to $15,000 will be provided on a competitive basis, with applications accepted through June 12th. The Illinois Office of Broadband, the Benton Institute for Broadband & Society, and area philanthropy will pair state and nonstate resources to help communities prepare for a better broadband future. Grantees will participate in focused in-person and/or online community-specific, regional, and cohort-wide activities during a period up to 12 months. Communities will be asked to form a representative community broadband Steering Committee and build toward creation of a community-driven broadband strategic plan that will position the community to take next steps, including as applicants, or community partners to applicants, seeking Connect Illinois Broadband Grant infrastructure funding. Illinois Connected Communities may apply for a second year of state funding designated for community-driven efforts to promote digital literacy, adoption, and inclusion. An informational webinar will be held at 11:30am on Friday, May 29. To register, visit: https://extension.illinois.edu/global/local-government-education

 

 
 

Birds construct their nests from just about any material they can find. But many items pose risks to them and their chicks. Jennifer Gordon, executive director of Carolina Waterfowl Rescue in North Carolina, says her team treats dozens of birds and chicks every year due to hazardous nesting materials. Gordon advises providing only natural materials. But even some natural elements aren’t always safe for bird nests. Pet fur, for example, could be dangerous if treated with flea medicine. You could provide twigs, leaves and other yard waste, small pieces of straw, grass clippings, and native plants. Do not provide human hair, yarn or string, dryer lint, or other materials which include synthetic, dyed, or other chemically treated fibers. For tips on how to make your home and yard a haven for birds, see Audubon’s Bird-Friendly Communities page. 

 

 
 

The Upper Mississippi River has been listed as the most endangered river for 2020, by American Rivers. The mission of American Rivers is to protect wild rivers, restore damaged rivers, and conserve clean water for people and nature. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration is predicting widespread flooding this spring, with major or moderate floods in 23 states, including those in the Mississippi’s path. The Upper Mississippi is at risk of flooding, displacing vulnerable populations. Lives, businesses, property and public health are all at risk, at a time when the nation’s resources are already stretched dangerously thin. The good news is that proven solutions can protect people while giving rivers room to flood safely. These strategies require planning and policy change.

 

 
 

When local governments suddenly face recessions there are pressures to react swiftly. Oftentimes, the reactions are based on cutback budgeting habits instead of careful management of the current or expected budget deficit. On Friday, June 5 at Noon CST, Illinois Extension’s Local Government Education program will co-host COVID-19 Response: Cutback Budgeting for Local Officials, to outline three points to guide cutback budgeting based on research on how local governments managed previous recessions. The focus is on leadership and management of cutback budgeting decisions, framing cutback discussions, and thinking about immediate and long-term strategies. Co-hosts of this program are Illinois Association of County Administrators, Illinois Association of County Board Members, Northern Illinois University Center for Governmental Studies, and Northern Illinois University School of Public and Global Affairs. Presenters for the webinar include the award-winning Michael C. Van Milligen, City Manager for the City of Dubuque, IA, Chris Goodman, Assistant Professor with the Department of Public Administration at Northern Illinois University, and Kurt Thurmaier, Distinguished Engagement Professor and Chair of the Department of Public Administration at Northern Illinois University. Illinois Association of County Boards will also provide an update on legislative issues and federal funding to kick off this critical topic of budget adjustments for local governments. Register Now

 

UPCOMING EVENTS

May 29 (Webinar) Illinois Connected Communities Grant Program

June 3 (Webinar Series) - Developing Broadband Leadership - Part 4: Digital Inclusion

June 5 (Webinar)Covid-19 Response: Cutback Budgets for Local Officials

June 18 (Webinar) – Diversity, Equity, and Green Infrastructure

June 26 (Webinar) - Central Illinois Volunteerism Conference

July 16 (Webinar) - Racial Equity: From Agency-wide Initiatives to Social Service Delivery Programs

August 6 (Webinar) Public Service Motivation

August 10-13 - Midwest Community Development Institute CANCELLED

October 31 - Deadline to Complete the Census

 
 
 
 
 

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