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Click here to see this online
 
 
 

July 2, 2021

 

 
 
ACES 
 

The University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences (ACES) has opened the new Feed Technology Center. The $20-million facility on South Race Street in Urbana replaces the 1920s-era feed mill on St. Mary’s Road, originally built to process university-grown grain and feed university-owned livestock. The new Feed Technology Center’s capabilities go far beyond that intent, with state-of-the-art processing and sensor technologies delivering standard and specialized small-batch research diets, as well as unparalleled hands-on educational opportunities for students across the College of ACES. Take the virtual tour of the Feed Technology Center!

 

 
 
 UoI Flash Index
 

The June University of Illinois Flash Index continued its climb with an increase to 106.0 from its 105.3 level in May, remaining well above the 100-level that divides growth and decline. Recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic maintained a pace few would have dreamed of a year ago at the end of fiscal year 2020. State revenues for FY2021 from the three major tax sources (the individual income, corporate, and sales taxes) rose significantly over FY2020 after adjusting for inflation. These revenues were up more than 10% over FY2019 — the last year unaffected by the COVID-19 crisis. In addition, the state received significant transfers from the federal government. “The state ended the fiscal year in the best shape in several years, with its bond rating actually rising,” said University of Illinois economist J. Fred Giertz, who compiles the monthly index for the Institute of Government and Public Affairs. “This comes even after the failure of the proposed state constitutional amendment to allow graduated income tax rates, which was expected to generate substantial new revenue.” Giertz cautioned that Illinois’ fiscal struggles are likely not over yet. “Unfortunately, the underlying fiscal challenges remain and will be accentuated when federal aid related to the COVID-19 pandemic is reduced.” Despite the strong recovery, the Illinois unemployment rate remained at 7.1%, more than one percentage point above the national level. The rate should continue to fall with the reduction of federal stimulus payments that have slowed the movement back to work along with the strong pent-up demand from depressed consumption during the crisis. 

 

 
 
Time for Lunch 
 

School-age children ate more fruits and vegetables when they had to sit at the lunch table for 20 minutes versus half that long. With 38 children ages 8-14 participating at an Illinois summer camp, those with the 20-minute requirement ate 84.2% of the fruits and 65.3% of the vegetables served to them, compared with 72.9% and 51.2%, respectively, among those who were required to stay seated for just 10 minutes, according to Melissa Pflugh Prescott, PhD, and colleagues at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. "These results support a 20-minute seated lunch policy, which could improve diet quality and reduce food waste in children," Pflugh Prescott and colleagues concluded. Called "Time for Lunch," the study used a cross-over design to expose participants to both seating requirement conditions an equal number of times. Five different food assortments were offered during the 4-week study, each available four times, randomized to the 10- or 20-minute seating requirement such that each appeared twice during each condition. Children, whose mean age was about 12 (SD 1.2), could then select the foods they wanted from these menus. The research team also kept watch on participants during lunch, tracking how often they stood up, talked with other children, used their phones, and when they left the table. Children were asked to rate their meals as well.

 

 
 
 LGE Webinar Series
 

Illinois Extension’s Local Government Education program will host the Illinois Office of Broadband and the Benton Institute for Broadband & Society for Part 3 of the Developing Broadband Leadership Webinar Series - Funding and Partnerships, which will offer detailed information on federal, state and local finance tools. This discussion will include partnership examples ranging from market development, grants and loans, ownership and operational models. This session will be held from 11:30AM -1PM Central Time on Tuesday, July 13. Moderators from the Illinois Office of Broadband, Illinois Extension, and the Benton Institute of Broadband and Society will steer the presentations and discussions and facilitate audience questions. See Illinois Extension’s community broadband development page for archived recordings from this series.

 

 
 

UPCOMING EVENTS

July 13 - EDEN Preparing the Urban Canopy for Weather-Related Disasters

July 13 - Developing Broadband Leadership (Part 3): Funding and Partnerships

July 27 - Developing Broadband Leadership (Part 4): Moving a Broadband Project Forward

July 29 - Geothermal in Illinois: Overview and Technology

August 3 - Developing Broadband Leadership (Part 5): Broadband Adoption and Affordability: Ensuring Broadband for Everyone

 

 
 
 
 
 

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